Neblina Forest Birding Tours

Colombia

The Proaves Reserves

Itinerary 1

The Proaves Reserves Tour

The leading conservationist group in Colombia PROAVES had purchased and protected nearly 20,000 hectares (nearly 45,600 acres) saving and restoring habitat for some of the most endangered bird species throughout Colombia The 16 protected areas represent the only alternative for the survival of many range restricted species. Most of the reserves are far apart from each other and long and strenuous traveling hours will be needed to visit them. All this effort will be rewarded by giving us the chance to see and enjoy some of the most endangered Colombia's bird species while supporting their conservation.

Recurve-billed Bushbird Reserve (Reserva Hormiguero de Torcorama) Pre Trip

Day 1.

After a late afternoon arrival in Bogotá we will be transferred to our Hotel in Bogotá.

Day 2. Early morning birding La Florida marshes near Bogota to catch our morning flight to Bucaramanaga and transferring to the small city of Ocaña.

After an early morning and before our flight to the city of Bucaramanga we will take a short drive to the La Florida marshes in route to the airport where we will have a great opportunity to look for Noble Snipe, the endemics Bogota Rail and Silvery-throated Spinetail and the nearly endemic Rufous-browed Conebill. Once we arrive to Bucaramanga we will drive to Ocaña to check in at our hotel. This afternoon we will have our first visit to the Hormiguero de Torcorama Reserve. Night in Ocaña.

Day 3. Early morning drive north of Ocaña to search for the Perijá Parakeet and birding return to Ocaña for the night.

Weather and road conditions permitting we will take a four wheel drive vehicle drive northwest of Ocaña in search for the endemic and rare Perijá Parakeet Pyrrhura caeruleiceps. The Perija Parakeet population is estimated to be between 30 to 50 individual birds. It will take us almost 3 hours to get to the site in order to be able to look for the bird therefore this day will be only included in the Pre Trip for people that is particularly king on seeing this species. The ProAves reserve staff discovered the site of a roost for a group of six individuals of the Perija Parakeet and accounting with the fact that we get to the site and a proper time during the day will warrant we will find this species listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Night in Ocaña.

Day 4. Early morning drive to the Reserva Hormiguero de Torcoroma (Recurve-billed Bushbird Reserve) for the morning and afternoon drive to Reinita Cielo Azul.

A mere 20minutes drive will have us in the small 80 hectare reserve where we will be looking for the ultra rare Recurve-billed Bushbird, other birds might include Black-fronted Wood-Quail, Short-tailed Emerald, Stripe-breasted Spinetail, Speckled Tanager, Bare-eyed and Chestnut-bellied Thrushes, Gray-throated Warbler and Moustached Brush-Finch. The Bushbird prefers the dense Bamboo stands and we will be looking for it mainly inside forest; after lunch we will head to the city of Bucaramanaga for the night. END OF THE PRETRIP.

Day 5.

Morning pick up for participants of the main trip and drive to San Vicente de Chuqurí and Reinita Cielo Azul Reserve (Cerulean Warbler Reserve). Night Reinita Cielo Azul Lodge.

Itinerary 2

The ProAves Reserves Main Trip

Day 1.

After a late afternoon arrival in Bogotá we will be transferred to our Hotel in Bogotá.

Day 2. Early morning birding La Florida marshes near Bogota to catch our morning flight to Bucaramanaga and transferring to the small city of San Vicente de Chuqurí and onward to the Pauxi pauxi Reserve (Helmeted Curassow Reserve).

After an early morning and before our flight to the city of Bucaramanga we will take a short drive to the La Florida marshes in route to the airport where we will have a great opportunity to look for Noble Snipe, the endemics Bogota Rail and Silvery-throated Spinetail and the nearly endemic Rufous-browed Conebill. Once we arrive to Bucaramanga we will be joined by the participants that took the Hormiguero de Torcorama Pre Trip and we will drive to San Vicente de Chuqurí and Pauxi pauxi Reserve. The afternoon will be dedicated to explore the vicinity of the lodge specially looking for the endemic Beautiful Woodpecker and the rare Saffron-headed Parrot. Night Pauxi pauxi Lodge.

Day 3. Morning birding the Pauxi pauxi Reserve and afternoon drive to San Vicente de Chuqurí and onward to the Reinita Cielo Azul Reserve.

The early morning will have us walking up the hill to look for the roosting site where Saffron-headed Parrots roost during the night. This will warrant wonderful views of this range restricted and endangered species. Still before lunch we will explore some of the trails near the lodge looking for Citron-throated and Black-mandibled Toucans, the endemics White-mantled Barbet and Beautiful Woodpecker and also Rufous-crested Coquette, Green Thorntail, Double-banded Graytail, Dull-mantled Antbird, Striped and White-bibbed Manakins, Rufous-naped Greenlet and Yellow-browed Shrike-Vireo. After lunch we will start our way back to San Vicente de Chuqurí and to the Reinita Cielo Azul Reserve (Cerulean Warbler Reserve). The afternoon will be dedicated to explore the vicinity of the lodge specially looking for Cerulean Warbler and the endemic Turquoise Dacnis. Night Reinita Cielo Azul Lodge.

Day 4. Full day birding the Reinita Cielo Azul Reserve. Night Reinita Cielo Azul Reserve.

We will have the entire day to leisurely explore the many different habitats in within the reserve. To get access to the primary forest preserve we will have to take a 2 miles walk up the mountain through pasture land. The hike roughly takes more than an hour until reaching the forest entrance. The possibility of horseback riding the vegetation denuded slop will be offered for those willing to do it. Immediately after arriving to the forest edge our search for specialties will start. A very short walk into a side forest trail will take us to an area with inside forest hummingbird feeders and a feeding station for understory birds. This site will provide excellent views of the endemics Gorgeted Wood-Quail and Black Inca and Lined Quail-Dove. The main trail into the reserve is part of a 150 year-old cobblestone path climbing through primary forest that is moderately strenuous but the wet surface might be slippery and you constantly have to be looking your feet; nevertheless the primary forest is home of several range restricted species including the endemics Parker's Antbird, Upper Magdalena Tapaculo and Colombian Mountain Grackle. Some of the other specialties of the reserve include Highland Tinamou, Moustached Puffbird, Brown-billed Scythebill, Uniform Antshrike, Chestnut-crowned Gnateater, Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet and Yellow-throated Spadebill. The higher stretches of forest are home to the newly described Yarigues subspecies of Yellow-breasted Brush-Finch and Colombian Mountain Grackle. Night Reinita Cielo Azul Lodge.

Day 5. Early morning birding the Cerulean Warbler Reserve and afternoon drive to EL Paujil Bird Reserve (Blue-billed Curassow Reserve). Night Paujil Lodge.

Today depending on our interests we might return back to the forest and search for any of the species that might have eluded us or search for birds in the area neighboring the lodge. The lodge itself has some hummingbird feeders and flowers that attract the endemic Indigo-capped Hummingbird. The reserve cabins are located in a pasture with scattered trees and scrub where we can also find Spectacled Parrotlet, Bar-crested Antshrike, Scrub Tanager, Yellow-tufted Dacnis, the endemic Turquoise Dacnis, Rufous-naped Greenlet and Cerulean and Golden-winged Warblers (October to March). In our way out of the reserve we will have a short detour to look for the endemic and critically endangered Chestnut-bellied Hummingbird. The rest of the day will be dedicated to the long drive transfer to reach the Paujil Reserve. We will try to arrive in the late afternoon so we can bird our way along the last part of the road to access the reserve. Night Paujil lodge.

Day 6. Full day birding the grounds of the El Paujil Reserve. Night El Paujil Reserve.

We will spend two days in the reserve looking for the extremely shy and endemic Blue-billed Curassow, one of the great news is that there are motion sensitive cameras set up near the lodge. These cameras are recording what approaches the lodge and to the surprise and pleasure of the visitors and managers the Curassows do get close to the lodge! We certainly will try to match the Curassows daily pattern to be able to see it. The best area to look for the Curassows is located across the river following a fairly steep trail throughout forest. This trail well maintained trail is also a good place to look for endemics White-mantled Barbet, Antioquia Bristle-Tyrant, White-bibbed Manakin and Sooty Ant-Tanager along with Saffron-headed Parrot, Dull-mantled Antbird Bare-crowned Antbird, Southern Bentbill, Yellow-browed Shrike-Vireo, and Fulvous-vented Euphonia. If our visits takes place during the nesting season for the Blue-billed Curassow we certainly will take advantage of the stake out nest that might be already founded by the park rangers greatly enhancing our chances to see this very much sought after bird. Night Paujil lodge.

Day 7. Full day birding the grounds of the El Paujil Reserve. Night El Paujil Lodge.

While the Curassows can be difficult to find, other species such as Pale-bellied and Stripe-throated Hermits, Violet-bellied and Shining-green Hummingbirds, Citron-throated Toucan, Cinnamon Woodpecker, Black Antshrike, Bare-crowned Antbird, Brown-capped Tyrannulet, Southern Bentbill, Black-billed Flycatcher, Black-chested Jay, Slate-colored Grosbeak and Fulvous-vented Euphonia can be seen by walking the inside forest trails near the lodge. This day could be also used as buffer day as for to have one more chance to look for the much advertised Curassow. Some marshy areas close to the lodge are home to White-throated and Russet-crowned Crakes, Greater Ani and waterbirds including Rufescent Tiger-Heron. The clearings around the cabin and the adjacent river edge forest are a good place to look for the endemic Colombian Chachalaca. Night Paujil lodge.

Day 8. Morning birding the Paujil Reserve and transfer to the Arrierito Antioqueño Reserve.

After a last morning birding in the El Paujil Reserve Grounds we will start our drive to Some of the birds we will looking for during the morning included Northern Screamer, Blue-chested Hummingbird, Violet-bellied Hummingbird, Black-breasted and Barred Puffbirds, Slate-headed Tody-Tyrant, Panama Flycatcher, and Orange-crowned Oriole. The rest of the morning will be dedicated to our LONG drive to the Arrierito Antioqueño Reserve.

Day 9. Full day birding the Arrierito Antioqueño Reserve.

Today we will explore the forest trails inside Arrierito Antioqueño Reserve. The long but rewarding inside forest walks cut through wonderful forest. Certainly the target for the day will be the Arrierito itself, the endemic Chestnut-capped Piha , along with Sickle-winged Guan, Moustached Puffbird, Lanceolated Monklet, Blue-fronted Parrotlet, Lyre-tailed Nightjar, Pavonine Cuckoo, Brown-billed Scythebill, the endemics Chestnut Wood-Quail and Parker's Antbird, Ochre-breasted Antpitta, endemics Stile's Tapaculo, Black-and-gold Tanager, Multicolored Tanager, Rufous-browed Tyrannulet, Indigo Flowerpiercer and Purplish-mantled Tanager.

Day 10. Early mornig birding the Arrierito Antioqueño Reserve and afternoon transfer to Jardín.

During the early morning we will bird the areas close to the lodge and along the road in serch for the endemics Colombian Chachalaca and Sooty-headed Wren and the endemics Yellow-throated Brush-Finch and Red-bellied Grackle. Still during the morning we will start heading towards one of the prettiest villages in all South America, the small town of El Jardin. Night In Jardin. Night Hotel in Jardín.

Day 11. Full day birding the El Loro Orejiamarillo Reserve (Yellow-eared Parrot Reserve) .

Today we will start very early in the morning to drive to the El Loro Orejiamarillo Reserve (Yellow eared Parrot Reserve), we will spend the entire day looking for the Parrots (which are not that difficult to find). Jardín is the best place to find the Critically Endangered and spectacular Colombian species, the Yellow-eared Parrot. A growing population of 350 of these large parrots inhabits the steep hillsides above Jardin, dependent on the endangered wax palm for nesting and roosting sites. Other species include the rare and habitat restricted Tanager Finch along with the endemic Munchique Wood-Wren, White-capped Parrot, Andean Toucanet, Black-billed Mountain-Toucan, Tyrannine Woodcreeper, White-browed Spinetail, Streaked Tuftedcheek, Striped Treehunter, Spillmann's Tapaculo, Red-crested Cotinga, Chestnut-crested Cotinga, Green-and-black Fruiteater, Barred Fruiteater, Rufous-breasted Flycatcher, Rufous-headed Pygmy-Tyrant, Black-throated Tody-Tyrant, Handsome Flycatcher, Golden-fronted Whitestart, Chestnut-headed Oropendola, Subtropical Cacique, Northern Mountain Cacique, Citrine Warbler, Capped Conebill, Blue-naped Chlorophonia, Blue-and-black Tanager, Purplish-mantled Tanager, Golden-crowned Tanager, Lacrimose Mountain-Tanager, White-capped Tanager, Gray-hooded Bush-Tanager, Black-capped Hemispingus, Plushcap and Slaty Brush-Finch. Night in Jardín.

Day 12. Early morning birding the El Jardín area and afternoon transfer to Carmen de Atrato.

This day we will have a last morning birding in the El Jardin area then we will start our drive to Carmen de Atrato. Near Jardín we can also find the endemic Red-bellied Grackle. Time permitting we will visit the Tangaras Reserve this very afternoon. Night Carmen de Atrato.

Day 13. Full day birding the Tangaras Reserve. Night Carmen de Atrato.

The Tangaras Reserve is located 1 ½ hours away from Carmen de Atrato. By spending an entire day at the reserve we will be visiting the home of several range restricted species including Toucan Barbet, Fulvous-dotted Treerunner, Pacific Tuftedcheek, the very rare Bicolored Antvireo, Yellow-breasted Antpitta, Narino Tapaculo, Bonze-olive Pygmy-Tyrant, Handsome Flycatcher,Olivaceous Piha, Orange-breasted Fruiteater, the endemic Gold-ringed Tanager, Glistening-green Tanager, Rufous-throated Tanager, Black-chinned Mountain-Tanager, Black Solitaire, the endemic Munchique Wood-Wren, Choco Brush-Finch and Olive Finches. The reserve also has a convenient set of hummingbird feeders where several hummingbird species are easily seen. Some of the common visitors at the feeders are Tawny-bellied Hermit, Empress Brilliant, Brown Inca, Velvet-purple Coronet, Greenish Puffleg and Violet-tailed Sylph. Night in Carmen the Atrato.

Day 14. Full day birding the Tangaras Reserve and afternoon transfer to Medellin. Night Medellín.

This day we will have a last morning birding in the Tangaras Reserve then we will start our drive back to Medellin for the night. For those taking the Post Trip extension we will continue our trip to Urrao. From Urrao we will be transfer to La Pinera where we will start a horseback ride to climb to the Páramo de Frontino to get access to the Colibrí del Sol Bird Reserve. We might even arrive early enough as for to watch hummingbirds at the feeders close to the cabin where Tourmaline Sunangel, Mountain Velvetbreast and White-bellied Woodstars occur. . Night Colibrí del Sol dormitory.

Day 15.

Morning transfer for international flights back home.

The El Mirador Reserve Extension

Day 15. Morning birding Colibrí del Sol Bird Reserve and afternoon return to Urrao and transfer to Medellín.

The first light of the day will find us looking at the Antpitta feeding station near the cabin where the newly described and endemic Urrao Antpitta can be seeing attending the earthworm feeding technique. Later in the morning we will jump on our horses climb to the Páramo. As we ascend to the Páramo we will stop to look at some convenient hummingbird feeders to wait for the recently re-discovered and endemic Dusky Starfrontlet. Then we will complete our climb to get right to the tree line and look for the rarer and endemic Chestnut-bellied Flowerpiercer. Here also at the tree line could also find Purple-backed Thornbill, Ash-coloured Tapaculo, Black-chested Mountain-Tanager and the range restricted endemic Paramillo Tapaculo. The area neighboring the cabin might also produce White-rumped Hawk, Rusty-faced Parrot, Golden-breasted and Glowing Pufflegs, Long-tailed Antbird, Dusky Piha, Hooded Mountain-Tanager, Red-hooded Tanager and White-capped Tanager. During the afternoon we will start our descend to Urrao and continue with our drive to Medellin for the Night.

Day 16.

Morning transfer for international flights back home.

The Santa Marta endemics

The "Sierra Nevada of the Santa Marta Mountains" is a clear example of bird speciation resulting from a long period of isolation. This green, humid and lush mountain range is isolated from the rest of the Andes by a "sea" of dry forest providing the "Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta" with the highest bird endemism area in Colombia. Her more than 25% (20 species) of the Colombian endemics occur and there are at least 39 endemic subspecies (some of which might even deserve the rank of a full species!). The drier areas surrounding the mountains are also home to a handful number of bird species that are only shares with remote areas of Venezuela including, 3 more Colombian endemics; such birding bonanza is only parallel by the beauty of the sunset of the Caribbean ocean watched from the comfortable balcony of "El Dorado" lodge.

Day 1. Late afternoon arrival in Barranquilla and transfer to our hotel for the night.

This trip could also start with a flight from Bogotá to Santa Marta city, but starting in Barranquilla will save us the price of an internal domestic flight ticket (it requires the entire group take the same flight!). After arriving in Barranquilla or Cartagena in the late afternoon, we will have transfer to our comfortable Hotel in Barranquilla for the night.

Day 2. Early morning drive to Via Parque Isla Salamanca for the morning and afternoon drive to Santa Marta. Late afternoon birding along the Naguange entrance to Tayrona National Park. Night in Santa Marta city.

We will leave Barranquilla very early in the morning to be at first light in the Cacti dominated dry scrub of "Parque Via Isla Salamanca" to look for the endemic Chestnut-winged Chachalaca. This Chachalaca often sits on top of the Candelabra Cactus to sun bath in the early morning, and we will be waiting for them with our scope. Soon after we will head for the Cocos visitor center inside "PVIS" (Salamanca Park) to walk through mangrove forest in search of one of the rarest birds in Colombia the enigmatic and endemic Sapphire-bellied Hummingbird. Other birds here include Bare-eyed Pigeon, Red-rumped Woodpecker, Brown-throated Parakeet, Northern Scrub-Flycatcher, Black-crested Antshrike, the common Bicolored Conebill, Bronzed Cowbird (for some this is the Bronze-brown Cowbird, an endemic species to Colombia) and the rare Chestnut Piculet; as soon as the heat of the day arrives we will explore the wetlands protected in the park (birds communities will vary accordingly with the month of the year and water level and depending on whether our customers hail from the New World or the Old World, (just ask us for the possibilities!). Here we will be looking for Fulvous Whistling-duck, Black-bellied Whistling-duck, Cinnamon Teal, White-cheeked Pintail, Black-necked Stilt, several Sandpipers, Gulls and Plover species, Black-collared Hawk, Glossy Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, Pied Water-tyrant and White-headed Marsh-Tyrant. Later on the day we will drive beyond Santa Marta city to the Neguanje entrance of the Tayrona NP in search of the rare and local Black-backed Antshrike and maybe with a bit of luck will also find the very localized Tocuyo Sparrow. Night in Santa Marta City.

Day 3. Early morning birding along the "Las Tinajas road and birding transfer to Tayrona NP. Night Tayrona.

We will start early from Santa Marta to arrive early at "Las Tinajas" side road and try for the range restricted Lilac-tailed Parakeet along with a set of more common species including Red-crowned Woodpecker, Rufous-tailed Jacamar, Whooping Motmot, Orange-chinned Parakeet, Coppery Emerald, White-bearded Manakin, Pale-breasted Thrush and Bicolored Wren; as soon as the heat of the day sets in, we will head to the Tayrona National Park near Calabazo and check into our charming facilities right by the beach. The late afternoon will be devoted to look for some the specialties from the park including the localized Pale-tipped Tyrannulet right in the mangrove area near the lodge.

Day 4. Early morning birding the Tayrona NP and transfer to La Guajira, late afternoon birding near Caricari. Night in Rio Hacha.

The various trails and main road of Tayrona National Park will offer many opportunities to look for forest species including the ultra rare and hard to come by endemic Blue-knobbed Curassow (YES, we have seen the Curassow inside the park!) along with Crested Guan, Crimson-crested Woodpecker, Keel-billed Toucan, Yellow-billed Cuckoo (only during migration), Rufous-breasted Hermit, Western Long-tailed Hermit, Sooty-capped Hermit, White-chinned Sapphire, White-necked Puffbird, Cocoa Woodcreeper, Red-billed Scythebill, Western-Slaty Anshrike, Jet Antbird, Northern White-fringed Antwren, White-bellied Antbird, Lance-tailed Manakins, Southern Bentbill, Yellow-breasted Flycatcher, Golden-fronted Greenlet, Gray-headed Tanager, Carib Grackle, Yellow Oriole and Orange-crowned Oriole. After lunch we will start our nearly 3 hour drive to Rio Acha, but not before stopping along the side road to Caricari in the late afternoon where we will search for: Rufous-vented Chachalaca, Crested Bobwhite, Chestnut Piculet, Russet-throated Puffbird, Bare-eyed Pigeons, Blue-crowned Parakeet, Brown-throated Parakeet, Green-rumped Parrotlet, Ferruginous Pygmy Owl, Sapphire-throated Hummingbird, Red-billed Emeral, Carribean Hornero, White-wiskered Spinetail, Yellow-chinned Spinetail, Straight-billed Woodcreeper, Northern White-fringed Antwren, Slender-billed Tyrannulet, Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant, Pied-water Tyrant, Scrub Greenlet, Glaucus Tanager, Trinidad Euphonia, Orange-crowned Oriole and Gray-pileated Finch.

Day 5. Early morning birding the Perico road and Los Flamencos Park, afternoon return to pass through Santa Marta to the small and charming town of La Minca. Night La Minca.

A very early start will take us at first light along the road near Perico where we will have one more opportunity for almost all the species mentioned for Caricari. Also we will try to add to our list species such as Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Bare-eyed Pigeon, Common Ground-Dove, Scaled Dove, Buffy Hummingbird, Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant, Venezuelan Flycatcher, Black-faced Grassquit and Vermilion Cardinal; later in the morning we will head towards the town of Camarones stopping in the way for the Orinocan Saltator, Tocuyo Sparrow and many of the waterbirds by the Los Flamencos lake, such as Reddish Egret, Tricolored Heron, White Ibis, Scarlet Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, Caribbean Flamingo, White-checked Pintail, Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Harris´s Hawk, Laughing Gull, Caspian and Royal Tern and Black Skimmer. After lunch and during the heat of the day we will drive back to the small town of La Minca; during the last hours of light we will look for birds in the semi-deciduous dry forest near La Minca, such as White-vented Plumeleteer, the rare endemic Santa Marta Sabrewing, Scaled Piculet, Santa Marta Foliage Gleaner (endemic species), Pale-eyed Pygmy-Tyrant, Cinereous Becard, Rufous-breasted Wren, Rufous-and-white Wren, Swallow Tanager (endemic subspecies), Dull-collored Grassquit, Rusty Flowerpiercer, Crimson-backed Tanager and Golden-winged Sparrow.

Day 6. Birding from La Minca to El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado Lodge.

The first hours in the morning will be devoted to looking for species that might have eluded us the previous afternoon in the nearby La Minca dry forest. Later on in the day, we will drive to higher elevation toward the world famous "El Dorado" Reserve with many exciting stops along the way looking for Scaled Pigeon, Coppery Emerald, Steely-vented Hummingbird, White-vented Plumeleteer, the rare and endemic Blossomcrown, the endemic Santa Marta Woodstart, Collared Aracari, the endemic Santa Marta Toucanet, Yellow-billed Toucanet, Golden-olive Woodpecker, Pale-breasted Spinetail , Streaked Xenops, Montane Foliage-gleaner, Cocoa Woodcreeper, Slaty Antwren, the endemic Santa Marta Tapaculo, Golden-breasted Fruiteater, Olive-striped Flycatcher, Venezuelan Tyrannulet, Cinnamon Flycatcher, Orange-billed Nightingale-Thrush, the endemic White-lored Warbler and the endemic Santa Marta Brush-Finch. We will arrive with sufficient daylight remaining so that we can look at the fruit and hummingbird feeders at the "Jeniam Restaurant"

Day 7. Full day El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado Lodge.

The next two days will be devoted to further exploration of the San Lorenzo ridge road above the "Jeniam Lodge" where many of the special birds from the mountains occur. Most of efforts will be dedicated looking for Band-tailed Guan, Sickle-winged Guan, Lined Quail-Dove, the endemic Santa Marta Parakeet, Mountain Velvetbreast , the endemic White-tailed Starfrontlet, the endemic Black-backed Thornbill, Masked Trogon, White-tipped Quetzal, Streak-capped Spinetail, the endemic Rusty-headed Spinetail, Flamulated Treehunter, Strong-billed Woodcreeper, the endemic Santa Marta Antpitta, Rusty-breasted Antpitta, the endemic Brown-rumped Tapaculo, Golden-breasted Fruiteater, Black-capped Tyrannulet, Great Thrush (endemic subspecies), the endemic Yellow-crowned Whitstart, the endemics Santa Marta and White-lored Warblers, Blue-capped Tanager, the endemic Santa Marta Mountain-Tanager, Blue-naped Chlorophonia, Slaty-backed Nightingale-Thrush, Yellow-legged Thrush, the endemic Santa Marta Brush-Finch and Stripe-headed Brush-Finch

Day 8. Full day El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado Lodge.

Other species worthy of mentioning here include Black-fronted Wood-Quail, Gray-throated Leaftosser, Montane Woodcreeper, White-throated Tyrannulet, Black-throated Tody-Tyrant, Cinnamon Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Chat-Tyrant, Black-hooded Thrush, Páramo Seedeater and Slate-throated Whitestart, all of which are represented as endemic subspecies restricted to the Santa Marta Mountain range. A small bit of stamina during the nights, and we will also look for the recently described Santa Marta Screech-Owl, which has been recorded very close to the lodge.

Day 9. Full day birding from the El Dorado Reserve to Santa Marta. Night in Santa Marta city.

The Santa Marta Wren is most likely beyond our reach because their ranges are mainly restricted to the remote south side of the mountains. This day will be devoted to look for any species we may have missed in the previous day. In the afternoon we will start our return to the city of Santa Marta.

Day 10. Early morning birding the Mamancana reserve before catching our mid-morning flight out to Bogotá and transfer to International flights back home.

Our last few hours in the Santa Marta region will see us exploring the Mamancana reserve where we might have an extra chance for some of the drier habitat species including Red-bellied Emerald, Rufous-tailed Jacamar, Russet-throated Puffbird, Chestnut Piculet Black-crested Antshrike, Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant, Venezuelan Flycatcher, Bicolored Wren, Scrub Greenlet and Gray-pileated Finch among many others. Participants not taking the Bogotá extension will be transfer to a Barranquilla Hotel for the night to take their flights returning home the following morning.

The Cauca Valley

Itinerary 1

Itinerary 1

The Cauca Valley, one of the important eco-regions in Colombia, the Cauca Valley is home to a handful of endemic species not occurring anywhere else in the country. The Western and Central Cordilleras on both flanks of the valley harbor many species with ranges restricted to the cloud forests and grassland Páramos of the mountains. Some of these species are shared with bordering Ecuador but most of them are more easily seen in Colombia where the populations of such species are either better represented or found in areas of easier access. This trip will allow us to look for 21 Colombian endemic species.

Day 1. Nov 1. Arrival in Cali International airport in the late morning and birding at Km 18 where we will be birding for the afternoon. Night in "Mi Universo".

Upon arrival at Cali international airport we will immediately head towards the cloud forest at Km18 to check in our lodge. Our lodge is located within access to wonderful forest and hummingbird feeders. We will spend the rest of day birding in the vicinity of our lodge. Several hummingbirds are possible here including, White-necked Jacobin, Andean Emerald, Speckled Hummingbird, Fawn-breasted Brilliant, Blue-headed Sapphires, Buff-tailed Coronet, Bronzy Inca, Long-billed Starthroat, Booted Raquet-tail, Long-tailed Sylph and Purple-throated Woodstar to name a few. We will also be looking for other species along a road that borders the forest and is free of traffic. Night at Mi Universo.

Day 2. Nov 2. Early morning birding the forest and road along Km 18, after lunch visit Luis Mazariegos´s House . Buga for the night.

We will spend the entire morning at km 18 looking for the first stars of our trip, the striking and beautiful endemic Multicolored Tanager and the endemic Colombian Chachalaca. Other species possible here include Crimson-rumped Toucanet, Azara´s and Red-faced Spinetails, Streak-capped Treehunter, Lineated Foliage-gleaner, Bar-crested Antshrike, Green-and-black Fruiteater, Golden winged Manakins, Barred Becard, Oleaginous Hemispingus (fairly common here), the endemic Flame-rumped Tanager (separated species from the Lemon-rumped Tanager) and Yellow-throated Brush-Finch. With a bit of luck we could also find the Rufous-crested Tanager, the uncommon (for this locality) Purplish-mantled Tanager and the rare Yellow-headed Manakin. After lunch we will head towards the small town of Buga where we will spend the night. On the way we will stop at the house of our friend Luis Mazariegos, an authority on Colombian hummingbirds, and a well known photographer whose works have appeared in several publication including the Handbook of the Birds of the World. Luis is also a great host and a humble person. His gardens are full of hummingbird feeders and he has at least 4 or 5 species that come to his feeders most of the time. The gaudy Rubby Topaz is one of them and the close-up views of the male Topaz will certainly make for a great day's finale. Night in Buga.

Day 3. Nov 3. Early morning birding the Yotoco Forest, afternoon birding at Laguna de Sonso and drive to Filandia.

A mere half an hour drive will take us from Buga to the Yotoco pretected forest. The Yotoco headquarters are surrounded by forest allowing plenty of views of Bat Falcon, Colombian Chachalaca (endemic), Scarlet-fronted Parakeets and Bronze-winged Parrot. The forest trail and some of the fruiting trees close to the main house will give us a chance for Collared Trogon, the endemic Grayish Piculet (fairly common here), Bar-crested Antshrike, White-throated Spadebill, Whiskered Wren, White-breasted Wood-Wren, Rufous-naped Greenlet, Golden-crowned, Guira Tanager, Golden-naped Tanager and Blue-naped Chlorophonia. We will also look for the secretive Yellow-headed Manakin and likely have another opportunity to enjoy the endemic Multicolored Tanager. After lunch we will go to the Laguna de Sonso in our way to Filandia. The amount of water in Laguna de Sonso is quite variable, and the birds we will see will depend on the amount of flooding at the time of our visit. We will have a chance for many waterbirds including various common and widespread herons, ibises, Limpkins, ducks, waders and kingfishers. To mention a few specialties, we have a good chance for Snail Kite, Cinnamon Teal and the uncommon Masked Duck. The deciduous habitat surrounding the lake are home to Spectacled Parrotlet, Dwarf Cuckoo, Greyish Piculet (uncommon but possible here) Spot-breasted and Red-crowned Woodpeckers, Jet Antbird, Slate-headed Tody-Tyrant, Pied Water-Tyrant, the endemic Apical Flycatcher, Cinereous Becard, Guira Tanagers, Yellow-hooded Blackbird. After a wonderful day of birding we drive to Filandia arriving there in the late afternoon or early evening where we will check in our charming and pleasant hotel. Night in Filandia.

Day 4. Nov 4. Early Morning birding the Cañon del Rio Barbas and drive to Cartago.

After an early breakfast we will head to the "Cañon del Rio Barbas" (Barbas River Canyon). We will bird down a road where we will get eye-level views of the tree tops, home to the endemic and localized Turquoise Dacnis-Tanager. Other species from the Rio Barbas Canyon will include Blue-headed Parrot, Green Hermit, Northern White-crowned Tapaculo, Red-headed Barbet, Rufous-naped Greenlet , Highland Hepatic Tanager, Flame-rumped Tanager, Scrub Tanager, Beryl-spangled Tanager, Black-capped Tanager, Green Honeycreeper, Gray Seedeater, Yellow-throated Brush-Finch and Black-winged Saltator. After lunch we will drive to the small town of El Cairo which will be our base in the next two days. Night in El Cairo.

Day 5. Nov 5. Full day birding El Cairo.

After an early breakfast we will drive to a humid, moss covered forest near El Cairo where many west slope Chocó specialties occur. We will be looking for special, rare and little-known endemic Gold-ringed Tanager (better seen here than anywhere else), and the not-so-gaudy but still rare and local endemic Munchique Wood-Wren. Other wonders of the area include Green and Twany-bellied Hermits, Western Emerald, Violet-tailed Sylph, Velvet-purple Coronet, White-tailed Hillstar, Empress Brilliant, Brown Inca, Highland Motmot, Yellow-vented Woodpecker, Rufous Spinetail, Spotted Barbtail, Pacific Tuftedcheek, the difficult-to-find Fulvous-dotted Treerunner, UniformTreehunter, the rare Bicolored Antvireo, Yellow-breasted Antpitta, Nariño Tapaculo, Orange-breasted Fruiteater, Black Solitaire, the difficult-to-find Indigo Flowerpiercer, Glistening-green Tanager, Black-chinned Mountain Tanager, Purplish-mantled Tanager (better seen here than anywhere else), Chocó Brushfinch and Chestnut-breasted Euphonia. Night in El Cairo.

Day 6. Nov 6. Early morning birding El Cairo and drive to Otún-Quimbaya.

One more early morning birding near El Cairo, this time concentrating our efforts on forest patches at lower elevations looking primarily for the localized and restricted, cool looking endemic Crested Ant-Tanager. We will also try to locate any other species that may have eluded us in the previous days. Afterwards we will drive to the Otum Quimbaya reserve. Night at La Suiza Lodge in Otum-Quimbaya.

Day 7. Nov 7. Morning birding Otún Quimbaya, afternoon birding in Rio Blanco and drive to Manisales.

The La Suiza lodge is a fabulous place. The lodge is surrounded by beautiful forest and all you have do to see forest birds is to step out of you cabin and stroll along the road entering the park. The reserve is the best place to look for the local and endemic Cauca Guan (long thought to be extinct until a healthy population was rediscovered in 1989 near Pereira at the actual location of the Otun-Quimbaya Reserve).We will also be looking for the endemics Chestnut Wood-Quail and Stiles´s Tapaculo, Sickle-winged Guan, Greenish Puffleg, Highland Motmot, Strong-billed Woodcreeper, Streak-capped Treehunter, Moustached Antpitta, Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet, Rufous-breasted Flycatcher, both Variegated and Marble-faced Bristle-Tyrants, Chestnut-breasted Wren, Pale-eyed and Glossy-black Thrushes and White-capped Tanagers, among many others. Here we will see the enigmatic Red-ruffed Fruitcrow which is better seen in this location than anywhere else in its range. At a slightly higher elevation, this is a good place to look for the much sought after Torrent Duck and White-capped Dipper. We will also look for other specialties of the area like Golden-plumed Parakeet, Multicolored Tanager (endemic), Dusky Piha, Slaty Brush-finch. We will try to find any other important bird that we may have missed the previous day. After an early lunch we will head to the Rio Blanco reserve beyond the city of Manisales for a late afternoon of birding before returning to our hotel in Manisales. Night in Manisales.

Day 8. Nov 8. Full day birding at Rio Blanco Reserve. Night in Manisales.

The Rio Blanco reserve not only provides quality water to the city of Manisales but habitat to many wonderful bird species that can be seen just by walking on the gentle slope tracks that cut through the forest. There are f hummingbird feeders by the main house which are attended by a constant flow of hummingbirds including Speckled Hummingbird, Fawn-breasted Brilliant, Buff-tailed Coronet, Bronzy Inca, Collared Inca, Tourmaline Sunangel, Long-tailed Sylph and White-bellied Woodstar. They have also started an Antpitta feeding station where the very local and endemic Brown-banded Antpitta sneaks into the territory of a dominant pair of Chestnut-crowned Antpittas.A few other species also show up at the banquette of worms, like the Bicolored Antpitta and the Stripe-headed Brush-Finch. Night in Manisales.

Day 9. Nov 9. Full day birding the Rio Blanco Reserve. Night in Manisales.

The Rio Blanco reserve is such a bird rich place that we need two full days of birding to cover the reserve properly. The bird life here is so diverse and spectacular that we stand a chance of seeing over xx species. We will have a good chance to see the endemic Chestnut Wood-Quail, Rusty-faced Parrot, Golden-plumed Parakeet, Andean Toucanet, Black-billed Mountain-Toucan, Crimson-mantled Woodpecker, Rufous Spinetail, Montane Foliage-gleaner, Streaked Xenops, Pearled Treerunner, Spotted Barbtail, Striped Treehunter, Tyranine Woodcreeper, Strong-billed Woodcreeper, Long-tailed Antbird, Bicolored Antpitta, Chesnut-naped Antpitta, Slate-crowned Antpitta, the rare and elusive Hooded Antpitta, Backish Tapaculo, Ash-colored Tapaculo, Spillman's Tapaculo, Black-capped Tyrannulet , White-tailed Tyrannulet, Mountain Elaenia, Handsome Flycatcher, Rufous-crowned Tody-Tyrant, Rufous-breasted Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied and Slaty-backed Chat-Tyrants, Pale-edged Flycatcher, Barred Becard, Green-and-black and Barred Fruiteaters, Pale-footed Swallow, Sharpe's Wren, Mountain Wren, Andean Solitaire, Black-hooded Thrush, Golden-fronted Whitestar, Citrine Warbler, Black-billed Peppershrike, Blue-backed Conebill, Common and Gray-hooded Bush-Tanagers, Black-capped, Superciliaried, Oleagineous and Black-eared Hemispingus, White-capped Tanager, Red-hooded Tanager, Grass-green Tanager, Lacrimose, Hooded, Scarlet-bellied, Buff-breasted and Blue-winged Mountain Tanagers, Golden, Metalic-green, Beryl-spangled Tanagers, Pluscap, Slaty and Chestnut-capped Brushfinches, the rare Masked Saltator, Northern Mountain Cacique and Yellow-bellied Siskin. Night in Manisales.

Day 10. Nov 10. Early morning birding the highlands of Nevado del Ruiz NP, afternoon birding the Bellavista Reserve and drive to Victoria.

Another early start will find us at first light in the upper cloud and elfin forest along the way to Nevado del Ruiz National Park, where our main goal will be to look for the rare and endemic Rufous-fronted Parakeet. There we also have a chance for Shining Sunbeam, Black-thighed and Golden-breasted Pufflegs, Great Sapphirewing, Viridian Metaltail, and Páramo Tapaculo. Other possibilities are the rare and seldom seen Ocellated Tapaculo and the uncommon Black-backed Bush Tanager. At a higher elevation close to the National Park entrance we will be looking for the Bearded Helmetcrest, which is hard tofind anywhere else, as well as White-chinned Thistletail, Andean Tit-Spinetail, Stout-billed Cinclodes, Tawny Antpitta, Plain-colored Seedeater and Plumbeous Sierra-Finch. The marshy areas and water ponds will also give us a chance for Andean Teal and Noble Snipe. Later on in the day we will drive over the Central Andes pass heading towards the Magdalena River to the small town of Victoria and on to our next birding destination, the surprising IBA Bellavista Reserve. Night at Victoria.

Day 11. Nov 11. Full day Bellavista Reserve.

A very short drive from Victoria will take us to the Bellavista reserve where many special birds will surely get our attention including Blue-ground Dove, the endemic Tolima Dove, Black-throated Mango, Shining-green Hummingbird, Violet-bellied Hummingbird, White-vented Plumetear, Northern Violaceous Trogon, Tody Motmot, Rufous-tailed Jacamar, Barred Puffbird, the endemic White-mantled Barbet, Collared Aracari, Citron-throated Toucan, Olivaceous Piculet, Bar-crested Antshrike, Western Slaty Antshrike, Northern White-fringed Antwren, Slate-headed Tody-Tyrant, Golden-headed and White-bearded Manakins, Black-bellied Wren, Yellow-backed Tanager, the endemic Sooty Ant-Tanager, Crimson-rumped Tanager, Plain-colored Tanager, Scrub Tanager, Golden-hooded Tanager, Yellow-tufted Dacnis, Black-striped Sparrow, Rufous-capped Warbler, the endemic Velvet-fronted Euphonia, Thick-billed and Orange-billed Euphonias.

Day 12. Nov 12. Early morning birding at Bellavista Reserve and the Victoria surroundings and drive to La Vega in the afternoon.

This morning we will bird the Bellavista Reserve in the early morning looking for any species that we may have missed. After lunch we will head towards the town of San Juan de La Vega stopping on the way for Pearl Kite, White-tailed Kite, Scarlet-fronted Parakeet, Spectacled Parrotlet, Dwarf Cuckoo, Spot-breated Woodpecker, Barred Antshrike, Mouse-colored Tyrannulet, Pale-breasted Thrush and Black-faced Tanager. Night in La Vega.

Day 13. Nov 13. Early morning birding in La Vega, and late afternoon birding in marshes near Bogotá.. Night in Bogota.

In the morning we will explore various areas in the La Vega valley looking for Short-tailed Emerald, Red-billed Scythebill, Bar-crested Antshrike, the very local and rare race of the Rusty-breasted Antpitta, the endemic Apical Flycatcher, Slate-headed Tody-Flycatcher, Rosy Thrush-Tanager, Gray-throated Warbler, Plain-colored Tanager and Black-headed Brushfinch. Early in the afternoon we will head to Bogotá stopping in one of the marshy habitats of either La Florida or La Conejera to look for Noble Snipe, the endemics Bogotá Rail and Silvery-throated Spinetail, the weird looking Subtropical Doradito and the nearly endemic Rufous-browed Conebill. Night in Bogota at our comfortable hotel.

Day 14. Nov 14. Early morning birding in La Florida marshes near Bogotá and transfer to the airport for the international flights back home.

Time permitting, if we are still missing some target birds,we will return to the marshes of La Florida before heading to airport for our international flights back home. The combination of these two main trip and the extension could produce at least 44 Colombian Endemic species.

Itinerary 2

Itinerary 2

The "Sierra Nevada of the Santa Marta Mountains" is a clear example of bird speciation resulting from a long period of isolation; the green, humid and lush mountain range is isolated from the rest of the Andes by a "sea" of dry forest providing the "Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta" with the highest bird endemism area in Colombia. Her more than 25% (20 species) of the Colombian endemics occur and there are at least 39 endemic subspecies (some of which might even deserve the rank of a full species!). The drier areas surrounding the mountains are also home to a handful number of bird species that are only shares with remote areas of Venezuela including, 3 more Colombian endemics; such birding bonanza is only parallel by the beauty of the sunset of the Caribbean ocean watched from the comfortable balcony of "El Dorado" lodge.

Day 14. Nov 14. Early morning birding in La Florida marshes near Bogota and catch our morning flight to Santa Marta. Late afternoon birding along the Naguange entrance to Tayrona National Park. Night in Santa Marta.

After an early morning and before our flight to Santa Marta city we will have a short drive to La Florida marshes in route to the airport where we will look for Noble Snipe, the endemics Bogota Rail and Silvery-throated Spinetail, the weird looking flycatcher Subtropical Doradito and the nearly endemic Rufous-browed Conebill. Once we arrive to Santa Marta we will check in our Hotel. Later on the day we will drive beyond Santa Marta city to the Neguanje entrance of the Tayrona NP in search of the rare and local Black-backed Antshrike and maybe with a bit of luck will also find the very localized Tocuyo Sparrow. Night in Santa Marta City.

Day 15. Nov 15. Early morning birding along the "Las Tinajas road and birding transfer to Tayrona NP. Night Tayrona.

We will start early from Santa Marta to arrive early at "Las Tinajas" side road and try for the range restricted Lilac-tailed Parakeet along with a set of more common species including Red-crowned Woodpecker, Rufous-tailed Jacamar, Blue-crowned Motmot, Orange-chinned Parakeet, Coppery Emerald, White-bearded Manakin, Pale-breasted Thrush and Bicolored Wren; as soon as the heat of the day sets in, we will head to the Tayrona National Park near Calabazo and check into our charming facilities right by the beach. The late afternoon will be devoted to look for some the specialties from the park including the localized Pale-tipped Tyrannulet right in the mangrove area near the lodge.

Day 16. Nov 16. Early morning birding the Tayrona NP and transfer to La Guajira, late afternoon birding near Caricari. Night in Rio Hacha.

The various trails and main road of Tayrona National Park will offer many opportunities to look for forest species including the ultra rare and hard to come by endemic Blue-knobbed Curassow (YES, we have seen the Curassow inside the park!) along with Crested Guan, Crimson-crested Woodpecker, Keel-billed Toucan, Yellow-billed Cuckoo (only during migration), Rufous-breasted Hermit, Western Long-tailed Hermit, Sooty-capped Hermit, White-chinned Sapphire, White-necked Puffbird, Cocoa Woodcreeper, Red-billed Scythebill, Western-Slaty Anshrike, Jet Antbird, Northern White-fringed Antwren, White-bellied Antbird, Lance-tailed Manakins, Southern Bentbill, Yellow-brested Flycatcher, Golden-fronted Greenlet, Gray-headed Tanager, Carib Grackle, Yellow Oriole and Orange-crowned Oriole. After lunch we will start our nearly 3 hour drive to Rio Acha, but not before stopping along the side road to Caricari in the late afternoon where we will search for: Rufous-vented Chachalaca, Crested Bobwhite, Chestnut Piculet, Russet-throated Puffbird, Bare-eyed Pigeons, Blue-crowned Parakeet, Brown-throated Parakeet, Green-rumped Parrotlet, Ferruginous Pygmy Owl, Sapphire-throated Hummingbird, Red-bellied Emerald, Chestnut Piculet, Carribean Hornero, White-wiskered Spinetail, Yellow-chinned Spinetail, Straight-billed Woodcreeper, Northern White-fringed Antwren, Slender-billed Tyrannulet, Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant, Pied-water Tyrant, Scrub Greenlet, Glaucus Tanager, Trinidad Euphonia, Orange-crowned Oriole and Gray-pileated Finch.

Day 17. Nov 17. Early morning birding the Perico road and Los Flamencos Park, afternoon return to Santa Marta where we will bird the Mamancana Reserve. Night in Santa Marta.

A very early start will take us at first light along the road near Perico where we will have one more opportunity for almost all the species mentioned for Caricari. Also we will try to add to our list species such as Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture Bare-eyed Pigeon, Common Ground-Dove, Scaled Dove, Buffy Hummingbird, Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant, Venezuelan Flycatcher, Black-faced Grassquit and Vermilion Cardinal; later in the morning we will head towards the town of Camarones stopping in the way for the Orinocan Saltator, Tocuyo Sparrow and many of the waterbirds by the Los Flamencos lake, such as Reddish Egret, Tricolored Heron, White Ibis, Scarlet Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, Caribbean Flamingo, White-checked Pintail, Lesser Yellow-headed Vulture, Harris´s Hawk, Laughing Gull, Caspian and Royal Tern and Black Skimmer. After lunch and during the heat of the day we will drive back to Santa Marta. This late afternoon we will visit the nearby Mamancana Reserve. Night in Santa Marta.

Day 18. Nov 18. Early morning drive to Via Parque Isla Salamanca for the morning , , afternoon return to pass through Santa Marta to the small and charming town of La Minca. Night La Minca.

We will leave Barranquilla very early in the morning to be at first light in the Cacti dominated dry scrub of "Parque Via Isla Salamanca" to look for the endemic Chestnut-winged Chachalaca. This Chachalaca often sits on top of the Candelabra Cactus to sun bath in the early morning, and we will be waiting for them with our scope. Soon after we will head for the Cocos visitor center inside "PVIS" (Salamanca Park) to walk through mangrove forest in search of one of the rarest birds in Colombia the enigmatic and endemic Sapphire-bellied Hummingbird. Other birds here include Bare-eyed Pigeon, Red-rumped Woodpecker, Brown-throated Parakeet, Northern Scrub-Flycatcher, Black-crested Antshrike, the common Bicolored Conebill, Bronzed Cowbird (for some this is the Bronze-brown Cowbird, an endemic species to Colombia) and the rare Chestnut Piculet; as soon as the heat of the day arrives we will explore the wetlands protected in the park (birds communities will vary accordingly with the month of the year and water level and depending on whether our customers hail from the New World or the Old World, (just ask us for the possibilities!). Here we will be looking for Fulvous Whistling-duck, Black-bellied Whistling-duck, Cinnamon Teal, White-cheeked Pintail, Black-necked Stilt, several Sandpipers, Gulls and Plover species, Black-collared Hawk, Glossy Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, Pied Water-tyrant and White-headed Marsh-Tyrant. After lunch and during the heat of the day we will drive back to the small town of La Minca; during the last hours of light we will look for birds in the semi-deciduous dry forest near La Minca, such as White-vented Plumeleteer, Scaled Piculet, Santa Marta Foliage Gleaner (endemic species), Pale-eyed Pygmy-Tyrant, Cinereous Becard, Rufous-breasted Wren, Rufous-and-white Wren, Swallow Tanager (endemic subspecies), Dull-collored Grassquit, Rusty Flowerpiercer, Crimson-backed Tanager and Golden-winged Sparrow.

Day 19. Nov 19. Birding transfer from La Minca to El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado reserve. Birding from La Minca to El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado Lodge.

The first hours in the morning well be devoted to looking for species that might have eluded us the previous afternoon in the nearby La Minca dry forest. Later on in the day, we will drive to higher elevation toward the world famous "El Dorado" Reserve with many exciting stops along the way looking for Scaled Pigeon, Coppery Emerald, Steely-vented Hummingbird, White-vented Plumeleteer, the rare and endemic Blossomcrown, the endemic Santa Marta Woodstart, Collared Aracari, the endemic Santa Marta Toucanet, Yellow-billed Toucanet, Golden-olive Woodpecker, Pale-breasted Spinetail , Streaked Xenops, Montane Foliage-gleaner, Cocoa Woodcreeper, Slaty Antwren, the endemic Santa Marta Tapaculo, Golden-breasted Fruiteater, Olive-striped Flycatcher, Venezuelan Tyrannulet, Cinnamon Flycatcher, Orange-billed Nightingale-Thrush, the endemic White-lored Warbler and the endemic Santa Marta Brush-Finch. We will arrive with sufficient daylight remaining so that we can look at the fruit and humminfeeders at the "Jeniam Lodge"

Day 20. Nov 20. Full day El Dorado Reserve.. Night Dorado Lodge.

The next two days will be devoted to further exploration ofthe San Lorenzo ridge road above the "Jeniam Lodge" where many of the special birds from the mountains occur. Most of efforts will be dedicated to looking for Band-tailed Guan, Sickle-winged Guan, Lined Quail-Dove, the endemic Santa Marta Parakeet, Mountain Velvetbreast , the endemic White-tailed Starfrontlet, the endemic Black-backed Thornbill, Masked Trogon, White-tipped Quetzal, Streak-capped Spinetail, the endemic Rusty-headed Spinetail, Flamulated Treehunter, Strong-billed Woodcreeper, the endemic Santa Marta Antpitta, Rusty-breasted Antpitta, the endemic Brown-rumped Tapaculo, Golden-breasted Fruiteater, Black-capped Tyrannulet, Great Thrush (endemic subspecies), the endemic Yellow-crowned Whitstart, the endemics Santa and White-lored Warblers, Blue-capped Tanager, the endemic Santa Marta Mountain-Tanager, Blue-naped Chlorophonia, Slaty-backed Nightingale-Thrush, Yellow-legged Thrush, the endemic Santa Marta Brush-Finch and Stripe-headed Brush-Finch.

Day 21. Nov 21. Full day El Dorado Reserve. Night Dorado Lodge.

Other species worthy of mentioning here include Black-fronted Wood-Quail, Gray-throated Leaftosser, Montane Woodcreeper, White-throated Tyrannulet, Black-throated Tody-Tyrant, Cinnamon Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Chat-Tyrant, Black-hooded Thrush, Páramo Seedeater and Slate-throated Whitestart, all of which are represented as endemic subspecies restricted to the Santa Marta Mountain range. A small bit of stamina during the nights, and we will also look for the recently described Santa Marta Screech-Owl, which has been recorded very close to the lodge.

Day 22. Nov 22. Early morning birding near El Dorado and return to Santa Marta to catch our flight to Bogotá.

Althouth the Santa Marta Wren and Santa Marta Sabrewing are most likely beyond our reach because their ranges are mainly restricted to the remote south side of the mountains, there is a small chance of finding the Santa Marta Sabrewing in EL Dorado because this species evidently is an altitudinal migrant. This day will be devoted to looking for any species we may have missed in the previous day. In the afternoon we will start our return to the city of Santa Marta to catch our late afternoon flight back to Bogotá.

Day 23. Nov 23.Transfer to international flights to return home.

Transfer to the international Airport to catch our flights returning home.

Bogota Endemics

Day 1.

After early-morning flights arrival to Bogotá birding transfer to Rogitama visiting Fuquene Lake in the way. Night in Villa de Leiva.
Upon arrival in Bogotá we will board into our transport to head to the Northeast of Bogota to continue with our trip. Depending on the time of arrival we will stop in some of the marshy habitat on the outskirts of Bogotá including the Fuquene Lake in the way to Rogitama where we will be looking for Spot-flanked Gallinule, Least Bittern and the endemic Apolinar´s Wren. It is a long journey but quite rewarding since the drive will take us to the charming Villa de Leyva for the night. Villa de Leyva is an interesting old town with cobbled streets and bursting with history. It is a place worthy of exploration for it is one of the most charming towns in Colombia. The town is only a mere hour drive away from Rogitama, our next birding destination.

Day 2.

Early morning drive to Rogitama and late morning drive to Soatá. Night in Soatá.
Rogitama is an environment friendly, farm which is the home of many notable species including Noble Snipe, the endemic Black Inca, the uncommon Lazuline Sabrewing, Green and Sparkling Violet-ear, the nearly endemic Short-tailed Emerald, the rare and local Golden-bellied Starfrontlet, Tyrian Metaltail, Yellow-breasted Brush Finch, the endemic Matorral (Pale-bellied) Tapaculo, Grassland Yellow-finch, Yellow-backed Oriole and Andean Siskin; at times and very sporadically the Mountain Grackle might also show up here. After a rewarding birding in Rogitama we will have a long drive to the town of Soatá for the night.

Day 3.

Early morning drive above Soatá to visit vast expands of Oak forest and afternoon return to Soatá to explore the dry habitat near the town.
Today we will start very early in the morning to drive to big remnant patches of Oak forest above the town of Soatá; explore the forested hills above the village to look for the endemic Mountain Grackle, along with several other species, such as Bronze-tailed Thornbill, Rusty-faced Parrot, Rufous-browed Conebill, Moustached Brush-Finch and Golden-fronted Whitestart. Later on the day we will descend one more time to Soatá to explore the outskirts and look for the endemic species Chestnut-bellied, Apical Flycatcher and Niceforo's Wren. Night in Soatá.

Day 4.

Early morning birding near Soatá and mid-morning transfer to Zipaquirá.
During the early morning we will explore the dry scrub habitat near Soatá in search for any species that might have eluded us the previous day and we will start our long journey back to small town of Zipaquirá.

Day 5.

Early morning drive to Parque Nacional Natural Chingaza for the day and drive return to Zipaquirá for the night.
Today we will be exploring the Mundo Nuevo private reserve near Parque Nacional Natural Chingaza to look for the endemic Flame-winged Parakeet along with Blue-fronted Starfrontlet, Coppery-bellied Puffleg, Bronze-tailed Thornbill, Black- billed Mountain-Toucan, White-chinned Thistletail, Rufous Antpitta, the endemic Matorral (Pale-bellied) Tapaculo, Slaty Brush-Finch, White-capped Tanager and Rufous-browed Conebill. During the late afternoon we will return back to Zipaquirá for the night.

Day 6.

Early morning birding La Florida Marshes and afternoon visit to "Jardín Encantado" hummingbird garden near San Francisco. Night La Vega.
A short drive to any of the marshy habitats of La Florida will give us a great opportunity to look for Noble Snipe, the endemics Bogota Rail and Silvery-throated Spinetail, the weird looking flycatcher Subtropical Doradito and the nearly endemic Rufous-browed Conebill. Later in the day we will head towards the small town of La Vega not before stopping in the "Jardín Encantado" hummingbird garden at the small town of San Francisco for the afternoon. The Enchanted garden boasts over 30 hummingbird feeders with a hummingbird list surpassing 18 species. Here the endemic Indigo‐capped hummingbird is one of the most common hummingbirds at the feeders. We will also have the opportunity to have close up views of Black‐throated Mango, White‐vented Plumeleteer, Booted racket‐tail, Purple‐crowned Fairy and Gorgeted Woodstar. Night in La Vega.

Day 7.

Early birding in La Vega and transfer to Victoria.
A morning exploring various areas in the La Vega valley will give us the opportunity to look for species such Short-tailed Emerald, Red-billed Scythebill, Bar-crested Antshrike, the very local and rare rara race of the Rusty-brested Antpitta, the endemic Apical Flycatcher, Slate-headed Tody-Flycatcher, Rosy Thrush-Tanager, the local and rare Gray-throated Warbler, Plain-colored Tanager and Black-headed Brush-Finch; later on the day we will head farther down and cross the Magdalena Valley towards the small town of Victoria stopping in the way for Pearl Kite, White-tailed kite, Scarlet-fronted Parakeet, Spectacled Parrotlet, Dwarf Cuckoo, Spot-breated Woodpecker, Barred Antshrike, Mouse-colored Tyrannulet, Pale-breasted Thrush and Black-faced Tanager. Night in Victoria, Caldas.

Day 8.

Full day birding in Bellavista Reserve. Night in Victoria.
Here we will search for Blue-ground Dove, the endemic Tolima Dove, Black-throated Mango, Shining-green Hummingbird, Violet-bellied Hummingbird, White-vented Plumetear, Northern Violaceous Trogon, Tody Motmot, Rufous,tailed Jacamar, Barred Puffbird, the endemic White-mantled Barbet, Collared Aracari, Citron-throated Toucan, Olivaceous Piculet, Bar-crested Antshrike, Western-slaty Antshrike, Northern White-fringed Antwren, the endemic Antioquia Bristle-tyrant, Golden-headed, White-bearded Manakin and the endemic White-bibbed Mankin, Black-bellied Wren, Yellow.backed Tananer, the endemic Sooty Ant-Tanager, Crimson-rumped Tanager, Plain-colored Tanager, Scrub Tanager, Golden-hooded Tanager, Yellow-tufted Dacnis, Black-striped Sparrow, Rufous-capped Warbler, the endemic Velvet-fronted Euphonia, Thick-billed and Orange-billed Euphonia. Night in Victoria, Caldas.

Day 9.

Early morning Bellavista and afternoon return to Bogotá.
Today we will start our return to Bogotá and pay a last morning visit to the astonishing Bellavista reserve where we will be looking for any species that might have eluded us. We will arrive in Bogotá at a convenient hour so we can get organized before our international flights returning home tomorrow.

Day 10.

Morning transfer for international flights back home.
Early morning transfer to Bogotá international airport after a wonderful trip.

Cundinamarca – Boyacá Plateau

Overview

Call direct and talk to the Bird Experts

Toll free 1-800-538-2149

Information

  • Trip extension: 12 days.
  • Average expected number of birds seen during the trip: 300 to 350 species
  • Colombian Vegetation Types Visited: 5 out of 25
  • Total habitats visited: 8+
  • Suggested departure: December to March, July and August

I am Gustavo Cañas-Valle, and I will be your group leader during your trip to Colombia. I have been to Colombia since 1991 and, over these 15 years, I have developed close human relationships with many people there. More than half of them are birders. All of them, Colombians, have proved over the years to be simple and warm people who have supported unselfishly my trips and my sometimes extended stays. I have explored more than half of this country, its neblina covered forests, its mountains, its paramos, its lakes and its people, with their many positive and some negative faces. I have learned to love and to respect this country. It is under these considerations that Neblina Forest has accepted to support this very much desired birding destination: Colombia.

Birding Colombia

Colombia is one of the best birding destinations in South America along with Ecuador. Colombia supports more birds than any other country in the world. Ecuador, on the other hand, has the record of number of bird species per unit area. If you are planning to go Birding Colombia we will provide you with one of the safest options to visit the country and at the same time with the most personal one. My Colombian friends and I will take you with us to places where birding is safe and fun, and where your entrance fee, when required, will support conservation and social development through tourism. Our Colombian birder-friends will bring along to our trips recent news on where and when to go visit a location.

Itinerary

Itinerary

OUR TRIP DAY BY DAY:

Day 1

Arrive in Colombia: "El Dorado" Intl. Airport, Bogota (2600 m / 8,530 ft). Transfer to Hotel. (Overnight in Bogotá). Note: Depending on your expected arrival time to Bogota we can coordinate a direct connection to Cali. This would mean that our overnight would be in Buga instead and we will have extra time for birding Sonso and Yotoco. Otherwise we will follow the schedule as is.

Day 2

Early start for a birding transfer to Pedropalo (1553 m / 5,095 ft). Spend our day birding the Pedropalo Area. Overnight in La Vega.

Day 3

Full day birding Pedropalo. Overnight in La Vega.

Day 4

Birding transfer to Arcabuco (2,772 m / 9094 ft). Overnight in Arcabuco.

Day 5-6

Two full days birding the Arcabuco Area. Overnights in Arcabuco.

Day 7

Birding transfer to Soatá (2711 m / 8,894 ft). Overnight in Soatá.

Day 8-9

Two full days birding Soatá. Overnights in Soatá.

Day 10

Early start for a birding transfer to Villa de Leyva (2119 m / 6,952 ft). Overnight in the Colonial town of Villa de Leyva.

Day 11

Early birding transfer to Bogotá, looking for any elusive endemics from the Cundinamarca-Boyacá Plateu. Overnight in Bogota.

Day 12

Transfer to the airport for your international flight back home or continue with any of our other extension programs.

Should you request it, this program can be considered as an eight-day extension to any of our Colombian programs.

Target Birds:

CUNDINAMARCA - BOYACÁ PLATEAU
Silvery-throated spinetail, Rufous-browed conebill*, Black inca*, Chestnut-bellied hummingbird, Apical flycatcher, Niceforo's wren*, Mountain grackle* Turquoise dacnis-tanager*, Flame-winged parakeet*, Apolinar's wren*, Bogota rail* *Endemic to Colombia

This program can be also combined with two eight-days extensions:

Cauca, and Magdalena Valleys, and Los Nevados National Park, visiting marshes, lakes and protected forests between Cali and Bogotá; and Santa Marta Endemics, exploring the Cienaga Grande de Santa Marta and Santa Marta Mountains Reserves.

Full day birding Abra Málaga. Night in Cusco.

Colombia Cauca and Magdalena

Overview

Call direct and talk to the Bird Experts

Toll free 1-800-538-2149

Information

  • Trip extension: 12 days.
  • Average expected number of birds seen during the trip: 400 to 450 species
  • Colombian Vegetation Types Visited:9 out of 25
  • Total habitats visited: 12+
  • Suggested departure: December to March, July and August

I am Gustavo Cañas-Valle, and I will be your group leader during your trip to Colombia. I have been to Colombia since 1991 and, over these 15 years, I have developed close human relationships with many people there. More than half of them are birders. All of them, Colombians, have proved over the years to be simple and warm people who have supported unselfishly my trips and my sometimes extended stays. I have explored more than half of this country, its neblina covered forests, its mountains, its paramos, its lakes and its people, with their many positive and some negative faces. I have learned to love and to respect this country. It is under these considerations that Neblina Forest has accepted to support this very much desired birding destination: Colombia.

Birding Colombia

Colombia is one of the best birding destinations in South America along with Ecuador. Colombia supports more birds than any other country in the world. Ecuador, on the other hand, has the record of number of bird species per unit area. If you are planning to go Birding Colombia we will provide you with one of the safest options to visit the country and at the same time with the most personal one. My Colombian friends and I will take you with us to places where birding is safe and fun, and where your entrance fee, when required, will support conservation and social development through tourism. Our Colombian birder-friends will bring along to our trips recent news on where and when to go visit a location.

Itinerary

Itinerary

OUR TRIP DAY BY DAY:

Day 1

Arrive in Colombia: "El Dorado" Intl. Airport, Bogota (2600 m / 8,530 ft). Transfer to Hotel. (Overnight in Bogotá). Note: Depending on your expected arrival time to Bogota we can coordinate a direct connection to Cali. This would mean that our overnight would be in Buga instead and we will have extra time for birding Sonso and Yotoco. Otherwise we will follow the schedule as is.

Day 2

Early departure to Cali "Alfonso Bonilla Aragón - Palmaseca" Intl. Airport (964 m / 3,162 ft). Birding transfer to Buga (970 m / 3,182 ft). Check in at our hotel in Buga. Afternoon birding session will happen along the access to Laguna de Sonso Reserve. Here we will start looking for the Cauca Valley Endemics. Evening walk around Buga and visit Buga's Lord of Miracles Cathedral. Buga is a religious destination in Colombia for annual pilgrimages. Overnight in Buga.

Day 3

Full day birding the Laguna de Sonso Reserve looking for its specialties. Overnight in Buga.

Day 4

Start early for a full birding day in Yotoco Reserve (1450 m / 4,757 ft). Overnight in Buga.

Day 5

Very early start for a full birding day in the Chicoral Area (About 1926 m / 6,322 ft. Overnight in Buga.

Day 6

Early start for our transfer to the Salento / Filandia area (1829 m to 2135 m / 6,000 to 7,004 ft). Full day birding the area. Overnight in Salento.

Day 7

Early start for a morning session in the Salento / Filandia Area. Transfer to Santa Rosa de Cabal Hotsprings (1824 m / 5,987 ft). Relaxed evening at the hotsprings. Overnight in Santa Rosa de Cabal.

Day 9

Today we will have a very early start for the transfer to Manizales (2000 m / 6561 ft). Sunrise birding at Río Blanco, where we will have our last chance for some of the Cauca Valley elusive endemics. After having breakfast in the Río Blanco Reserve (Range: 1600 m to 2630 m / 5,249 ft to 8,629 ft), we will spend the day birding the premises. Overnight in Rio Blanco Traditional Antioquian House.

Day 10

Start your day birding at your leisure from the external corridors of the Rio Blanco Antioquian House. Right after breakfast we will head to Los Nevados National Park (3881 m / 12,736 ft) with our luggage. Overnight in Honda (695 ft).

Day 11

Our usual early start to have breakfast in La Vega (878 m / 2,881 ft). We will have a full birding day in La Vega Area, looking for some Magdalena Valley endemics. Overnight in La Vega.

Day 12

Very early transfer to the Bogotá "El Dorado" Intl. Airport for your international flight back home or to Cartagena to continue with our Santa Marta extension.

Target Birds:

CAUCA VALLEY Cauca guan*, Antioquia bristle-tyrant*, Black-and-gold tanager*,Gold-ringed tanager*, Flame-rumped tanager, Chestnut-bellied flowerpiercer*, Turquoise dacnis-tanager*, Red-bellied grackle*, Rufous-fronted parakeet*, Indigo-winged parrot*, Multicolored tanager*, Chestnut wood-quail*, Greyish piculet*, Bicolored antpitta*, Brown-banded antpitta*

MAGDALENA VALLEY White-mantled barbet*, Olive-headed brush-finch*, Sooty ant-tanager*, Turquoise dacnis-tanager*, Indigo-capped hummingbird* This program can be combined with two eight-days extensions: Cundinamarca – Boyacá Plateau, visiting marshes, lakes and protected forests around Bogotá and Villa de Leyva; and Santa Marta Endemics, exploring the Cienaga Grande de Santa Marta and Santa Marta Mountains Reserves.

Full day birding Abra Málaga. Night in Cusco.

Country Facts

Call direct and talk to the Bird Experts
toll free 1-800-538-2149

COLOMBIA: The Birders Frontier

We just came from our most recent birding-adventure: Selected locations at Cauca and Magdalena Valleys and Santa Marta Mountains. Gustavo Cañas-Valle, Xavier Muñoz, Vinicio Ortiz and Bob Hargis had a whirlwind 11 day trip -with almost 9 effective birding days- and 290 species, a glance of the birdlife of some of the best birding locations in Colombia.
Our Itinerary and our Colombia - June 2007 Trip Report will give you an idea of the possibilities. Please request them to Gustavo. From September/07 you will have them on-line.

We have a 15 year relationship with our Colombian birding partners. We know the odds and ends of making a trip to Colombia a safe and memorable experience.

When comming to Colombia with us you support several local scientific organizations and Colombian birders all around the country.
See Travel Advice about Colombia from the Foreign & Commonwealth Office of the UK
We will tailor made your next trip to Colombia.
Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Xavier for further information.

COLOMBIA

Historical remarks

Source:
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/co.html

"Colombia was one of the three countries that emerged from the collapse of Gran Colombia in 1830 (the others are Ecuador and Venezuela). A 40-year conflict between government forces and anti-government insurgent groups and illegal paramilitary groups - both heavily funded by the drug trade - escalated during the 1990s.

The insurgents lack the military or popular support necessary to overthrow the government and violence has been decreasing since about 2002, but insurgents continue attacks against civilians and large swaths of the countryside are under guerrilla influence. Paramilitary groups challenge the insurgents for control of territory and the drug trade, and also the government's ability to exert its dominion over rural areas.

Although several thousand paramilitary members have demobilized since 2002 in an ongoing peace process, their commitment to ceasing illicit activity is unclear. While Bogotá steps up efforts to reassert government control throughout the country, neighboring countries worry about the violence spilling over their borders."

Location and People

Sources:
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/co.html
http://www.nogales.edu.co/2005/contenido/toaln/facts.htm

Colombia is located in Northern South America, bordering the Caribbean Sea, between Panama and Venezuela, and bordering the North Pacific Ocean, between Ecuador and Panama. It shares borders with Brazil (1,643 km), Ecuador (590 km), Panama (225 km), Peru (1,496 km [est.]), and Venezuela (2,050 km). It extends over a total area of 1,138,910 sq km (land surface: 1,038,700 sq km and territorial sea: 100,210 sq km), which includes Isla de Malpelo, Roncador Cay, Serrana Bank, and Serranilla Bank. It is slightly smaller than three times the size of Montana

It shelters 42,954,279 (July 2005 est.) inhabitants. The native language most of them speak is Spanish. Colombian ethnic groups are as follows: mestizo (58%), white (20%), mulatto (14%), black (4%), mixed black-Amerindian (3%), Amerindian (1%). Colombians are 90% Roman Catholic and 10% from other denominations. About literacy, 92.5% of the total Colombian population age 15 and over can read and write (2003 est.)..

Geography

Sources:
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/co.html http://www.nogales.edu.co/2005/contenido/toaln/facts.htm

Its territory presents both Atlantic and Pacific flat coastal lowlands, central highlands (two interandean valleys: Cauca and Magdalena Valleys, extending from south to north, which drain to the Atlantic), high Andes Mountains (three mountain ranges, also extending from south to north), and eastern lowland plains (southern Amazon plains and Northern Llanos). It is the only South American country with coastlines on both the North Pacific Ocean (1,448 km) and the Caribbean Sea (1,760 km). The altitudinal range goes from its lowest point: the Pacific Ocean 0 masl (meters above sea level), to its highest point: Pico Cristobal Colon 5,775 m, though, nearby Pico Simon Bolivar also has the same elevation.

Along the coast, in the Cauca and Magdalena Valleys and on the eastern lands, its territory presents typical tropical climate; it is cooler in the highlands (temperature depends on altitude not on season).

Environment

Natural hazards:

Highlands subject to volcanic eruptions; occasional earthquakes; periodic droughts

Environment - current issues:

deforestation; soil and water quality damage from overuse of pesticides; air pollution, especially in Bogota, from vehicle emissions

Colombian Birds at a glance...

  • 1822 Species Confirmed
  • 59 Endemic Species
  • XXX Restricted Range Species
  • XX Endangered Species
  • 155 Species of Hummingbirds
  • XXX Species of Tanagers
  • 168 Species of Ovenbirds
  • 107 Species of Typical Antbirds
  • XXX Species of Tyrant-Flycatchers
  • 54 Species of Parrots and Macaws

Note: This information is still being processed.

Main Airports

Sources:
http://www.azworldairports.com/airports/p1370ctg.htm,
http://worldaerodata.com/countries/Peru.php

  • Bogotá (El Dorado International Airport - BOG) Elevation: 8361 feet, 2548 meters.
  • Medellín-Río Negro (José María Córdova – MDE) Elevation: 7028 feet, 2142 meters
  • Cali (Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport- CLO) Elevation: 3162 feet, 964 meters
  • Cartagena (Rafael Núñez Airport – CTG) Elevation: 4 feet, 1 meters
  • Pereira (Matecaña Airport – PEI) Elevation: 4416 feet, 1346 meters

Culture

Sources:
ww.fundacionbat.com.co/festivales.php

Rich cultural traditions are still part of daily life. Colombia has all year around Festivales and Ferias from January through December.
One way to know Colombia's history and folklore is through our music and dance.

Here is a list of some Festivals:
Festival Internacional de la Canción Llanera, Festival de la Cumbia, Festival de Cultura Wayúu, Festival de Gaitas, Festival de la Arepa de Huevo, Festival de Música de Acordeón, XXXVI Torneo Internacional del Joropo y XI Reinado Internacional del Joropo, Festival Nacional de la Cumbia y la Cumbiamba, Festival de la Trova, Festival Nacional del Pasillo Colombiano, Festival Regional de Danza Folclórica, Festival de la Canción Colombiana, Torneo Internacional del Joropo y Contrapunteo, Concurso de Interpretes de la Canción Andina, Festival de la Confraternidad Amazónica, Festival de Música Llanera, Festival mi pedazo de acordeón en homenaje a Alejo Durán, Festival de la Butifarra, Festival Internacional de Cometas.

News and Economics

Economics & Currency Exchange

Sources:
http://eltiempo.terra.com.co/)

The country's currency is the Colombian Peso. At the Money Exchange companies the change for one US Dollar is $2,165.00 Colombian Pesos, and one US Dollar can be bought with $2,225.20 Colombian Pesos. The price of one Euro is $2,719.91 Colombian Pesos. (Information updated March 15, 2006.

Updated Local News

Major newspapers:
http://www.eltiempo.com/
http://www.semana.com/

Updated Economy News:

Major economic magazine:
http://www.lanota.com/

Power & Electrical Systems

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm

Updated Economy News

Major economic magazine:

http://www.gestion.dinediciones.com/

Power & Electrical Systems

Source:

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm

The table below summarizes information on the electrical systems in use in Colombia.

COUNTRY

VOLTAGE

FREQUENCY

PLUG

COMMENTS

Colombia

110V

60 Hz

A & B

 

This electrical system is similar to the one used in the United States though voltage in the states is 120V. Plugs used are type A (Flat blade attachment plug) and type B (Flat blades with round grounding pin). This electrical system is different than the one in the United Kingdom: voltage ranges from 230V to 240V with a 50 Hz frequency, and plugs are type G (Rectangular blade plug).

Some Facts about Bogotá

Source:
http://www.nogales.edu.co/2005/contenido/toaln/facts.htm

Bogotá, located in the mountainous center of Colombia, is its capital city. Its population is estimated in about 7,000.000 people. It is located at 2.600 mts (8,580 feet) above sea level. It presents a 15-20 Celsius (55º-65ºF) average temperature all year long. It presents beautiful countryside surroundings.

Useful Websites

Source:
http://www.nogales.edu.co/2005/contenido/toaln/facts.htm
Official gateway to Colombia: http://www.presidencia.gov.co/
Searcher engine: http://www.lalupa.com.co/
US Embassy in Colombia: http://www .usembassy.state.gov/colombia
Canadian Embassy in Colombia: http://www.bogota.gc.sa/